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October 16, 2020 | |Post a Comment

first_imgG’day mate! For most of January, I awoke in various locations throughout the big, wondrous land down under: Australia.A trip of a lifetime amounted to an ever-growing adventure. Every day was a unique journey, each moment, an exciting exploration. While abroad, I found ways to stay healthy and fit, which can be difficult to prioritize during travel. As I share a few insights from my three-week trip, I’ve decided to break it down into three parts: my favorite hike, workout tips from a local expert, and eating like an aborigine. This is part one.Royal National Park is an hour drive away from the big city of Sydney, and it holds the naturally formed phenomenon of the Figure 8 Pools on a rocky, coastal shelf. I’d like to clarify, for those ready to Google images, that there is actually only one figure eight formation. The rest are crystal blue, perfectly round holes deep enough to jump in and as such, they have become an Instagram sensation. However, what social media doesn’t share is the extremely arduous trek to get there.Arriving at the Figure 8 Pools requires, first checking the wave risk forecast, which ranges from Extreme to Very Low, on the NSW National Parks website. If unchecked, it can leave tourists stranded with rising tides and crashing waves. It also demands a good amount of endurance. Upon parking at Garrawarra Farm carpark, it’s a six-kilometer, descending walk through the forest, along the mountain, on a narrow trail just suitable for one person in both directions (and sometimes only one at a time). Once at sea level, you’ll walk across Burning Palms Beach, a remote beach akin to a scene out of “Lord of the Flies” or “The Beach.” After crossing the sands, the final part of the journey concludes with navigating across a dangerous, slippery rock shelf.If the view of the mountains meeting the ocean doesn’t take your breath away, the energy of the journey surely will. The hiking grade is rated Hard, with a total round-trip time of three hours.I didn’t travel all the way to Australia to take the easy path, and if you’re physically inclined, you should definitely add this hike to your travel bucket list.@NikkiOnTheDaily Sharelast_img read more

October 16, 2020 | |Post a Comment

first_img Artist Laurie Lambrecht. Independent/Courtesy Southampton Arts Center Share Artist Laurie Lambrecht. Independent/Courtesy Southampton Arts CenterApproximately 600 people gathered at the Southampton Arts Center on February 9 for the opening reception of “Takeover! Artists in Residence.” The new exhibit, curated by Amy Kirwin, has proven to be a successful breeding ground of creativity for not only the artists but the public as well. Two of the artists featured are Laurie Lambrecht, a Bridgehampton resident who integrates fiber work into her photography and Ruby Jackson, who currently lives in Sag Harbor. Indy caught up with Kirwin and the two artists to see how things have been panning out.How did you select the artists for Takeover?Amy Kirwin: I chose some based on knowledge of their work or personally knowing them and their personalities. A couple were recommended based on me looking for specific mediums to have diversity among each artist in residence. It was important that they be comfortable with the format — being open to working with people watching them, talking to the public, and also being willing to give a certain amount of time to SAC in the galleries during visitor hours.Some of the artists are already friends, and have been placed in the galleries near each other to promote collaboration and conversation.Have any surprising collaborations come from it?AK: Collaborations are beginning to happen, but something that is even more satisfying are the new friendships that are being formed between the artists.What is your artistic medium/style?Ruby Jackson: Some of my work is abstract but inspired by nature, especially marine life. Other work, like my clay miniature food, and rooms are figurative. I guess I would say my style is the Ruby Jackson style.I play with different materials, like polymer clay, plaster, wood, and paper. For the past eight years, I’ve been intrigued by glitter glue. It dries to a sturdy plastic that wears well with time, and has endless possibilities.What aspect of Takeover do you find most exciting?Laurie Lambrecht: Sharing my work and the process of making it to the local community has been rewarding and a pleasure, as has been being with the other artists and having spontaneous conversations in the relaxed atmosphere nurtured by the Southampton Arts Center.In what ways has your creativity changed during the Takeover?LL: Last weekend I taught a workshop in weaving for the first time at the SAC. It was a joy to have the opportunity to share something that I love doing and to potentially inspire others. Teaching there has led to me thinking about planning more workshops.I have been using the journeys to and from Southampton as an opportunity to start a new photo project that has been in my head for a while. Most days I spend time observing with my camera the tidelines in the bays in the vicinity. In the coming weeks, I’ll be sharing the accumulation of images in my studio at Takeover as proof prints.RJ: I took Laurie Lambrecht’s class in weaving, and am totally inspired. She is a wonderful artist and teacher, and she’s opened a new, wild, wonderful world of weaving to me. I hope to take every one of the artist’s classes. The best part of Takeover has been getting to know these other fabulous artists. Not only are they each uniquely talented, but they each have a lot of heart, warmth, and passion for what they do.Bravo to Amy for bringing together a very compatible, creative group. And, for even thinking of this in the first place. She is forming a genuine artists’ community.How does working in the public eye differ from working remotely?LL: The work I do while at the Center is really process work rather than thought centered. It is very difficult for me to concentrate and make choices without being immersed in solitude and quiet. I work a bit at home to develop ideas and then bring pieces to continue on at SAC.RJ: Being a teacher and performer prepares a person for being, speaking, and working in public. Acting classes, and 18 years of giving tours at the Pollock-Krasner House was good practice. Many years performing magic shows as the Amazing Rubini was also helpful.Personally, I am easily distracted, and I want to be available to talk to visitors. So, I have not been productive. But I’ve gotten lots of good ideas. I really need solitude and quiet to create.“Takeover” is on view through April 14. Visit www.southamptonartscenter.org for more information.nicole@indyeastend.comlast_img read more

October 6, 2020 | |Post a Comment

first_imgLegal and contractual issues, piracy and crime, and international sanctions are the most important areas of concern to merchant shipowners. Close behind are crewing and personnel, insurance regulation, loss prevention, environmental legislation, shipboard risk management, cargo preparation and stowage, and port state control.Consequently, owners want information and advice from their P&I clubs on how to tackle the problems associated with these areas. Their priorities have been revealed by the UK P&I Club’s latest member survey.As one of the world’s largest marine mutuals, the UK P&I Club’s 122 million gross tons of international merchant shipping provides a representative cross section of the industry. Some 259 people from among its member shipowners and their insurance brokers were interviewed, spread globally in relation to all major ship types and vessel ages.Members indicated that financial stability was the most important aspect of their relationship with any P&I club. This was followed by speedy claims resolution, strong working relationships, comprehensive loss prevention and risk management advice, understanding members’ business priorities, an extensive office and correspondents’ network, high quality executives and avoidance of unbudgeted calls.Nick Whitear, director at UK Club managers Thomas Miller, explained: “The aim of our survey has been to identify and understand the issues that really concern our members and those aspects of service and performance which are most important to them. The Club was very pleased with such a high level of participation across such a wide range of ship types, trade sectors, regional and international trades and corporate organisations.“We are committed to being the leading shipowner-controlled provider of protection & indemnity insurance and place great value on the opinions of our members about how we can extend and enhance what we do for them. However, a survey can only tell us part of the story, so we are always listening to our members’ views in all our dealings with them.”Overall, the UK Club scored a 96 per cent satisfaction rating from its shipowner members who recognised a consistently high level of performance. Over 80 per cent declared their contact with the Club’s underwriting and claims staff was “just right.”The UK Club publishes extensive materials on areas and issues raised by members, which are variously available in print and on its website (UKpandi)The Club has worked closely with the International Group of P&I Clubs to create detailed guidance on piracy and international sanctions. An updated edition of Frequently Asked Questions—and matching responses—on piracy was published on the Club website in August. These FAQs reflected the greater incidence of piracy and other violent crimes against ships and seafarers off the Gulf of Guinea coast. FAQs on US sanctions against Iran have also been recently revised.The Club has issued publications on handling dangerous cargoes in containers; environmental compliance in relation to ballast water management; and compliance with the Maritime Labour Convention which took effect on 21st August.The survey was undertaken independently by research firm Firebrand Insight under the codes of conduct of The Market Research Society and ESOMAR, the World Research Federation.UK P&I Club, October 3, 2013last_img read more

September 29, 2020 | |Post a Comment

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletterslast_img read more

September 29, 2020 | |Post a Comment

first_imgLuxembourg-based cargo airline Cargolux operated the flight, which after unloading at KKIA’s cargo terminal, continued to Hong Kong.Cargolux is Boeing’s launch customer for the 747-8 Freighter. Commenting on the arrival of the first Boeing 747-8F in Riyadh, Engr. Abdullah Al-Tassan, KKIA director general, said: “Cargolux has become one of our most important cargo airline clients at KKIA. The airline’s upgrade of its Riyadh service today confirms our important role in the air cargo industry. It is in line with our strategic plan to attract cargo airlines from all over the world and to increase the number of cargo flights on routes with high demand.”Commenting on the importance of Riyadh in the company’s global network, Frank Reimen, Cargolux president and chief executive officer, said: “We started our weekly service to Riyadh on August 1, 2010 with a Boeing 747-400 freighter. When we received our new flagship aircraft in October this year, we were keen to use the economics of the new-generation Boeing 747-8 freighter and deploy its enhanced payload capacity to King Khaled International Airport to bring high-value and temperature-sensitive goods to the Kingdom’s capital in a most efficient manner.Cargolux expanded its services to Saudi Arabia earlier last summer by adding Riyadh to its destination network and says that it has been carrying mostly high amounts of consumer goods, machinery and pharmaceuticals to the Saudi capital.last_img read more

September 28, 2020 | |Post a Comment

first_imgThe Conservatives’ British Bill of Rights is firmly back on the political agenda following the Queen’s speech today.The bill, a draft of which was originally promised before Christmas, will be ‘brought forward’ in the new parliamentary session, the Queen said.A government statement said the bill ‘will support and reinforce Britain’s longstanding commitment to human rights and restore common sense to the way human rights law is applied’.It will include measures ‘to reform and modernise the UK human rights framework’ as well as ‘protections against abuse of the system and misuse of human rights laws’, the government said. These rights would be based on those set out in the European Convention on Human Rights, ‘while also taking into account our common law tradition’, the government said, promising to consult fully on the proposals. In response to the announcement the Law Society said it remains fully committed to the rights enshrined in the European Convention of Human Rights, and to Britain’s membership of the convention. ‘We will be considering the draft bill carefully to ensure that it does not water down the rights we currently enjoy.’As expected, ambitious prison reforms will feature in the forthcoming legislative programme along with measures to tackle global tax evastion and to boost the digital economy. A Children and Social Work Bill aims to speed up the process of adoption, and will ensure courts and local authorities take ‘better account of a child’s need for stability up to the age of 18 when making decisions about their future’.The Law Society said it supports the principle, but added: ‘Any new proposals need to balance the wish for permanent and speed resolutions with making sure that all decisions are taken in the best interest of the child.’Meanwhile, a measure to privatise the operations of Land Registry will appear in the Neighbourhood Planning and Infrastructure Bill even though a consultation on the sell-off is still open.  ‘The new legislation would enable the privatisation of Land Registry, which would support the delivery of a modern, digitally based land registration service that will benefit the Land Registry’s customers, such as people buying or selling their home,’ a government briefing note says. The speech also promised to ‘bring forward’ proposals in response to the recommendations of the Law Commission’s 2011 report on simplifying land ownership law. The commission recommended simplifying the law to make it easier for people to know what obligations to attach to their land, and to make it easier to create, modify and extinguish those rights.last_img read more

September 28, 2020 | |Post a Comment

first_imgFreelance solicitors working outside a regulated firm will not be required to meet minimum levels of insurance cover, the Solicitors Regulation Authority has confirmed.In its consultation response to the second part of its Looking to the Future report, the SRA said freelance solicitors – as well as solicitors working in authorised firms – will be required to have in place ‘adequate and appropriate’ indemnity cover. They will have to explain to potential clients they are not covered by minimum terms and conditions of professional indemnity insurance.The Law Society has responded this afternoon by calling on super-regulator the Legal Services Board to throw out the plans. Chancery Lane warns that they will create a complex, multi-tiered system of regulation that will make it more difficult for consumers to make informed choices.The SRA said it introduced the insurance provision after respondents – who included the Law Society and Legal Services Consumer Panel – expressed concerns about PII issues during its consultation.The proposed model effectively allows freelance solicitors to operate on the same model as barristers who are attached to chambers and share back-office functions.The regulator has also extended a three-year practice requirement to freelance solicitors who wish to provide reserved legal services without being authorised as a sole practitioner. This was again following feedback in the consultation.The new SRA code will allow freelance solicitors to hold limited categories of money from clients in their own name, and the client must be told in advance where and how the money will be held.The SRA response states: ‘We believe the potential benefits of increased flexibility for both freelance solicitors and their clients mean we should proceed with the proposal. It is artificial and disproportionate to force those solicitors who are genuinely working on their own into the same regulatory model as a firm that may employ hundreds of people. It increases costs for those individuals and these costs are likely to be passed on to clients.’The regulator said it had not bowed to calls from some people to broaden its proposals, for example by allowing solicitors to have employees. The new provisions are intended to apply to genuine freelancers and not those running a firm employing others or who seek to disguise their firm using these arrangements.It is confirmed that clients of these practitioners will have access to the compensation fund and will be subject to new rules about publishing details on prices in specific areas and complaints procedure.Reforms are underpinned by a simpler set of principles, codes and rules for solicitors and law firms, which at 130 pages is at least 300 pages shorter than the existing handbook.Law Society president Joe Egan said: ‘We urge the LSB as the oversight regulator to consider the best interests of the public as well as the globally recognised high standards of the UK legal services and reject the SRA’s damaging proposals to alter the rulebook . The changes proposed would create unnecessary complexity and confusion, making it much more difficult for consumers to reach informed choices about legal services. They may also put consumers at risk and ultimately undermine trust in legal services.’He added: ‘We applaud the SRA for recognising the folly of proposals to allow newly qualified solicitors immediately to set up shop unsupervised, even if they still hope to see solicitors working freelance, with neither a firm over their head nor the badge of sole practitioner and the protections they bring. We believe that regulations should encourage and promote high standards of practice.’last_img read more

September 28, 2020 | |Post a Comment

first_imgGERMAN Railway’s carefully cultivated image of speed, safety and luxury built up since it launched IC-Express services on June 2 1991 is in tatters. The derailment at 10.59 on June 3 of ICE884 Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen at Eschede on the Hannover – Hamburg main line and its disastrous aftermath shocked DB and other operators of high speed trains. With a death toll of 100 and about 50 people seriously injured, it was Germany’s worst railway accident since 1945.ICE884 had left München on June 3 at 05.47 and had called at Hannover at 10.30; the 300 to 350 people on board expected to reach Hamburg at 11.52. Shortly after the train had passed through Celle, some passengers became alarmed by loud noises and rattling, but this quickly ceased, suggesting that the problem had righted itself. About 2min later, the noises returned, with disaster striking immediately.Piecing together the available evidence, the sequence of events would seem to be as follows. Around 5 to 6 km before the accident site a tyre becomes damaged or broken on one wheel of the third axle of the first trailer car. As the train approaches Eschede at the line speed of 200 km/h, it passes over a set of points about 300m before a road bridge. The damaged wheel strikes the pointwork, forcing an 8m long check rail upwards. This pierces and derails the first two trailers, causing the following cars to follow suit. While the first three trailers remain more or less upright, the fourth overturns, ending up on the east side of the four-track alignment. As these vehicles pass the bridge, one strikes the piers, causing the structure to collapse on the rear of the fifth car. The following restaurant car and trailer are crushed by the bridge deck, which now forms an immovable obstacle across all four tracks. The remaining cars, still being pushed by the rear power car, smash into the obstruction with devastating force, jacknifing against the bridge.Over 1000 people took part in the rescue operation, which lasted until the weekend of June 6-7; trains did not run through Eschede again until June 9. Several attempts had to be made to lift the 300 tonne bridge to release the crushed vehicles – one report suggested that the restaurant car had been squashed to a height of just 160mm.Examination of aerial photographs showed that the first three trailers were travelling on the inner of the two tracks on the east side of the alignment. The fifth car appears to have been on the outer track, which was severely damaged north of the bridge. South of the bridge this track appeared totally destroyed, while the rails of the main northbound track were bent towards the west. The rear power car’s position and the bent rails suggested that it was on the outer track. The leading power car had uncoupled from the rest of the train, coming to a halt 2 km further on.On June 4 DB announced that all ICE and IC trains would be subject to a temporary speed limit of 160 km/h, and that all 59 ICE1 trainsets would be withdrawn for special checks at the dedicated ICE workshops in München and Hamburg. The available fleet of 43 ICE2 sets plus IC and EC rolling stock was drafted in to help cover for the ICE1s, with some vehicles hired from Swiss and Austrian Federal Railways. Despite this, there were major delays and cancellations. Once the checks had been completed, the ICE1s were returned to service and given the all-clear to operate at their maximum speed of 280 km/h on the Neubaustrecken. But on June 13 DB withdrew the trains again in the wake of reports of broken wheels on the Hamburg S-Bahn and Hannover light rail cars. This time DB decided to refit the whole ICE1 fleet with monobloc wheels or resilient wheels with factory-new tyres before returning them to service.CausesEarly reports suggested that the crash had been caused by a car falling off the bridge in front of the train, but this was quickly discounted. DB Board Member Peter Münchschwander on June 4 ruled out signalling checks as the cause of the accident – two staff had been checking a lineside cabinet by the bridge, and the car was theirs. They are believed to be among the victims. DB also said no maintenance was in hand on the affected track at the time, although relaying was under way on the route about a month earlier.On June 4 marks were found on sleepers and trackside components about 5 km south of the crash site, indicating dragging or falling equipment. That evening investigators announced that debris recovered from the track was part of a wheel tyre, and this immediately shifted the focus of the search for the cause of the tragedy.The main enquiry is in the hands of the Federal Railway Office (Eisenbahn Bundesamt, EBA), but DB announced on June 8 that a special committee led by Research & Technology Director Roland Heinisch was being set up to examine all aspects of railway safety. The results will influence future operating strategies and further development of high speed services.The ICE involved, set 51, had accumulated around 3·5 million km in service and had just undergone a 20000 km maintenance examination, which included a wheel inspection – a process also carried out every two or three days. As originally set up, the wheel checks included an ultrasonic scan of the wheels, a stroboscopic check for profile abnormalities, and measurements to check for roundness. The process was largely automated, with a central computer analysing data from the ultrasonic and optical wheel scans. However, we understand that the ultrasonic modules in Hamburg and München ‘were not in permanent use’. This is because the read-out was not ‘absolutely definite’ as serious cracks could be obscured by numerous small cracks on the wheel surface. Hardening of the outer surface is also thought to reduce penetration of the ultrasonic signals. DB was well aware of the problem, and more advanced ultrasonic wheel checking equipment was due to begin tests in the week beginning June 29.EBA chief Horst Stuchly confirmed on June 4 that a wheel break was the likely cause of the accident, although other causes were still being investigated. He referred to a broken tyre, and the possibility of a fatigue failure or ‘external effect’ causing the break.While the root cause of the catastrophe remains uncertain, there are some pointers for the investigators. ICE1 sets originally had monobloc wheels, but were refitted with resilient wheels from 1992 onwards to mitigate vibration and a drumming sound affecting the trailer cars. It is known that the ICE1s suffered from out-of-round wheels, and DB’s Minden research centre had already produced a report on this phenomenon. There appears to be some linkage between this and track stiffness, and some experts suggest that the out-of-round phenomenon may be related to excitation of a loaded track resonance, with the unsprung mass bouncing on the track stiffness, possibly coinciding with a torsional resonance. Out-of-round wheels are likely to cause enormous dynamic loads, generating excessive bending of the resiliently-mounted wheel rims, and possibly leading to premature fracture. CAPTION: Top: The crumpled remains of ICE884, with the front part of coach 5 just visible to the top left, and the rear power car to the right of the mound of debris Associated Press RTCFig 1 (above): Position of the wreckage in relation to the bridge and pointwork indicates how factors combined to amplify the effects of the derailmentlast_img read more

September 26, 2020 | |Post a Comment

first_imgMartha Cuffy; Vice-President of Dominica Health and Wellness Association.Young entrepreneurs are being urged to register to participate in the Waitukubuli Entrepreneur Leve (WEL) 5th annual retreat at the Jungle Bay Resort and Spa in Delices.The week-long retreat scheduled for November 15 -21, 2014, will focus on imparting business skills, leadership and motivation to aspiring entrepreneurs in Dominica. The schedule allows for one-on-one consultations with mentors and networking with other entrepreneurs. Additionally, soft skills essential for creating a successful business such as team building and communication will be incorporated through group activities.Speaking at a press conference on September 15, 2014, Martha Cuffy vice- president of the Dominica Health and Wellness Association said that the launch of the program is in an effort to attract young Dominicans to take part in the retreat. Elias Dupuis; co owner of 365MMP“I always encourage people to apply because the application process is a way of saying I want to do something different in Dominica and…be part of this young business environment.”Ms Cuffy further stated that the program was borne out of an entrepreneur spirit, “so it is important that we hold this event at a venue that really exemplifies what we want to instill in this young entrepreneurs”.“This event is about lighting the fire of entrepreneurism in young people so they come along with their ideas, and be exposed to business of past WEL graduates and more experienced business people,” she continued.Elias Dupuis, a past WEL student and co-founder of 365MMP, in encouraging members of the public to register for the retreat said “it was truly a remarkable experience”.Sam Raphael; co-founder of WEL and owner of Jungle Bay Resort and Spa.“I have recommended it to a number of young people around the country. The truth is if you go to this entrepreneurs retreat, by the end of it you will certainly be inspired to go into business for yourself,” Dupuis said.Meanwhile, Sam Rafael co-founder of the program and owner of Jungle Bay Resort and Spa said the project is about bringing prospective and aspiring young entrepreneurs together “to be nurtured by those who have walked the walk before and who have something to share”.He added that about twenty experienced business people will come and share with the aspiring entrepreneurs during the week. Registration for the program commences today September 15th and application forms can be obtained at various credit unions around the island including Roseau, Portsmouth, Calibishie, Marigot, and Giraudel. The deadline for registration is October 3, 2014 after which an interview process will be held.Only twenty-five applicants will be chosen.Dominica Vibes News Share Share Share 288 Views   no discussionscenter_img Tweet Sharing is caring! LocalNews Entrepreneurs urged to register for 5th annual WEL retreat by: – September 15, 2014last_img read more

September 26, 2020 | |Post a Comment

first_img Share 35 Views   no discussions Share Share MOBILE, Alabama (AP) — Alabama’s main port in Mobile has signed an agreement meant to increase trade with Cuba.The Alabama State Port Authority says the five-year understanding signed Thursday aims to create and improve relationships between Cuban ports, the state port in Mobile and the maritime community.Alabama and the communist-controlled island already are conducting US-sanctioned trade involving forest and poultry products. Under the new agreement, state and Cuban port agencies can collaborate on projects including marketing studies, promotion and strategies.The federal government eased trade restrictions last year under former President Barack Obama’s move toward normalising relations with Cuba.Mobile is one of the nation’s largest cargo ports, handling some 25 million tons annually.center_img Tweet Sharing is caring! BusinessInternationalNewsPrintRegional Alabama port signs agreement with Cuba by: Associated Press – February 3, 2017last_img read more